Issue of binge drinking in colleges

Drunk, disoriented, and bleeding from severe facial lacerations after falling down a flight of stairs, an year-old Wabash College freshman was carried to a bed by his Delta Tau Delta fraternity brothers in October He was found to have a 0.

Issue of binge drinking in colleges

Print version College Drinking Harmful and underage college drinking are significant public health problems, and they exact an enormous toll on the intellectual and social lives of students on campuses across the United States.

Drinking at college has become a ritual that students often see as an integral part of their higher education experience. Many students come to college with established drinking habits, and the college environment can exacerbate the problem.

According to a national survey, almost 60 percent of college students ages 18—22 drank alcohol in the past month,1 and almost 2 out of 3 of them engaged in binge drinking during that same timeframe.

Binge drinking is a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration BAC levels to 0. This typically occurs after 4 drinks for women and 5 drinks for men—in about 2 hours. Drinking this way can pose serious health and safety risks, including car crashes, drunk-driving arrests, sexual assaults, and injuries.

Over the long term, frequent binge drinking can damage the liver and other organs. Drinking affects college students, their families, and college communities at large.

Researchers estimate that each year: Death About 1, college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor-vehicle crashes.

To avoid binge drinking and its consequences, college Issue of binge drinking in colleges and all people who drink are advised to track the number of drinks they consume over a given period of time.

The Harvard Study

That is why it is important to know exactly what counts as a drink. In the United States, a standard drink is one that contains about 14 grams of pure alcohol, which is found in: A large cup of beer, an overpoured glass of wine, or a single mixed drink could contain much more alcohol than a standard drink.

About 97, students between the ages of 18 and 24 report experiencing alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape. Factors Affecting Student Drinking Although the majority of students come to college already having some experience with alcohol, certain aspects of college life, such as unstructured time, the widespread availability of alcohol, inconsistent enforcement of underage drinking laws, and limited interactions with parents and other adults, can intensify the problem.

In fact, college students have higher binge-drinking rates and a higher incidence of driving under the influence of alcohol than their non-college peers. The first 6 weeks of freshman year are a vulnerable time for heavy drinking and alcohol-related consequences because of student expectations and social pressures at the start of the academic year.

Factors related to specific college environments also are significant.

Issue of binge drinking in colleges

Students attending schools with strong Greek systems and with prominent athletic programs tend to drink more than students at other types of schools.

In terms of living arrangements, alcohol consumption is highest among students living in fraternities and sororities and lowest among commuting students who live with their families. An often-overlooked preventive factor involves the continuing influence of parents.

Research shows that students who choose not to drink often do so because their parents discussed alcohol use and its adverse consequences with them. Addressing College Drinking Ongoing research continues to improve our understanding of how to address the persistent and costly problem of harmful and underage student drinking.

Successful efforts typically involve a mix of strategies that target individual students, the student body as a whole, and the broader college community. Alcohol poisoning and college students Thousands of college students are transported to the emergency room each year for alcohol poisoning, which occurs when high levels of alcohol suppress the nervous and respiratory systems and the body struggles to rid itself of toxins produced from the breakdown of alcohol.

Signs of this dangerous condition can include: Mental confusion, stupor, coma, or the person cannot be roused Vomiting Slow or irregular breathing Hypothermia or low body temperature, bluish or pale skin Alcohol poisoning can lead to permanent brain damage or death, so a person showing any of these signs requires immediate medical attention.

Call if you suspect alcohol poisoning. Strategies Targeting Individual Students Individual-level interventions target students, including those in higher-risk groups such as firstyear students, student athletes, members of Greek organizations, and mandated students. Categories of individual-level interventions include: Education and awareness programs.Binge drinking is a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels to g/dL.

This typically occurs after 4 drinks for women and 5 drinks for men—in about 2 hours. Drinking this way can pose serious health and safety risks, including car crashes, drunk-driving arrests, sexual assaults, and injuries.

While drinking and partying is typically considered part of college culture, studies past and present clearly illustrate patterns of increased drinking and binge drinking which, at the least, can derail the pursuit of education, and worse, can lead to behaviors and situations which can lead to death.

The issue of college binge drinking has been something well known for quite some time now. As I asked relatives of mine, they told me that binge drinking was definitely a prominent activity among their campuses when they went college in the ’s.

May 22,  · College Drinking: Maybe Not a Disorder but Still a Big Problem. Binge drinking wreaks havoc on young people's lives — . Binge Drinking Binge drinking is a serious but preventable public health problem. Binge drinking is the most common, costly, and deadly pattern of excessive alcohol use in the United States.

1,2,3 The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism External defines binge drinking as a pattern of drinking that brings a person’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to grams percent or above. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism leslutinsduphoenix.com • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

College Drinking. fact, college students have higher binge-drinking rates. and a higher incidence of .

College Drinking: A Serious Problem That Needs Treatment | leslutinsduphoenix.com